NostalgiaMigranta

26 Aug 2011 829 views
 
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photoblog image My Peachtree Street: Playing High With Lichtenstein

My Peachtree Street: Playing High With Lichtenstein

For a color version click HERE

 

The hot and steamy evening was crawling through the Piano piazza like a mountain cat.

“Art doesn’t transform. It just plain forms,” he whispered with his raspy voice, in between two gulps of beer.

I was not the slightest bit intimidated by the fame of my companion. “Oh yeah?” I said, “Why do you think the Soviet regime was so oppressive to so many books, music, movies et cetera? Yes, sir. Because art carries ideas that could transform how people think,” a sip of a well chilled late harvest Gewürztraminer pleasantly rolled down my throat, “Your definition of art is very narrow, Tovarich Roy.”

“I   like   to   pretend   that   my   art   has   nothing   to   do   with   me,” each of his words was slowly penetrating the smoke rings of his cigar. 

“Your art has nothing to do with anything,” I said, “With a small exception it is all kitsch. It has no ideas, which could transform people’s minds.”

I looked at the empty bottle: for me the conversation has ended with the end of the wine. His eyes were half closed.  In silence I melted into the hot Southern night.

My Peachtree Street: Playing High With Lichtenstein

For a color version click HERE

 

The hot and steamy evening was crawling through the Piano piazza like a mountain cat.

“Art doesn’t transform. It just plain forms,” he whispered with his raspy voice, in between two gulps of beer.

I was not the slightest bit intimidated by the fame of my companion. “Oh yeah?” I said, “Why do you think the Soviet regime was so oppressive to so many books, music, movies et cetera? Yes, sir. Because art carries ideas that could transform how people think,” a sip of a well chilled late harvest Gewürztraminer pleasantly rolled down my throat, “Your definition of art is very narrow, Tovarich Roy.”

“I   like   to   pretend   that   my   art   has   nothing   to   do   with   me,” each of his words was slowly penetrating the smoke rings of his cigar. 

“Your art has nothing to do with anything,” I said, “With a small exception it is all kitsch. It has no ideas, which could transform people’s minds.”

I looked at the empty bottle: for me the conversation has ended with the end of the wine. His eyes were half closed.  In silence I melted into the hot Southern night.

comments (14)

  • Ray
  • Manila, Philippines
  • 26 Aug 2011, 01:50
"When I grow up
I'm gonna..."
vz-nostalgia: :
Little Lichtenstein’s house: “When I grow up, I'm gonna be big and beautiful and sophisticated as you are.”
Richard Meier’s High Museum of Art building: “Boy, first, go to school and study arts (composition, color theory, painting, sculpture, history of art...), and how they interact with each other. Then learn how buildings are built: study mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems, and how building materials work. Then gain knowledge in urban design: learn how buildings intercommunicate with the environment... and so on. Otherwise, you will grow up into a big, but stupid and ugly dumb-ass house.”
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 26 Aug 2011, 09:34
Comrade Lichtenstein may have had little in the way of meaning in his painting, but he refreshingly didn't take himself too seriously either ;o) Excellent photo.
vz-nostalgia: any artist who doesn't take him/herself too seriously deserves a nod of admiration.
It's really funny to flip through some mediocre photography on a blog and then to read on teh About page some serious statements with references to famous photographers and a proud long list of the expensive equipment . smile
  • anniedog
  • Great Britain
  • 26 Aug 2011, 09:44
Does all art have to transform people's minds? Discuss. I like both b/w and colour versions but for the colour has the edge.
vz-nostalgia: :
anniedog: Does all art have to transform people's minds?
VZ: Ideally, I think, yes. But it doesn't have to do it always. What it should do always, though, is to have an idea. And it doesn't have to be a political idea (like, say, Picasso's Guernica, or Francisco Goya's powerful statements against war. Speaking of Guernica, Picasso made a reproduction of it in tapestry for the stage of The Security Council at the United Nations. Before Colin Powell’s (then the US Secretary of State) speech that pushed the war against Iraq (now we know that his statements were bogus), per the demand of the United States delegation the Guernica tapestry was covered by a blue curtain, because his speech was televised by all major TV networks. I don’t see much of a difference in between, say, the suppression of jazz and rock by the Soviet regime, in fear of exposing people’s minds to the “capitalist cultural propaganda”, and this case of covering the anti war image by the representative of the US military-industrial complex in fear of looking laughably ridiculous.)
Of course, the ideas in art could be purely aesthetic, as impressionists proved it. Art shall touch, wake up emotions in us, otherwise we end up with Marcel Duchamp’s phony “Bottle Drying Rack”, or Kazimir Malevich’s “White on White” bullsh@t, or Piet Mondrian’s meaningless cold geometric exercises.
You know what is my personal litmus test for art? A question “So what?” If I look at a painting, or a photograph (could be whatever) and ask myself that question, I don’t even bother thinking if it’s art or not. All is clear at this point.
Still, I realize that the boundaries are blurry, and the perception of art is very personal: some enjoy Kenny G, some John Coltrane (both play/d soprano saxophone), and the differences here could be irreconcilable, but do you think I, at least, made my case for the beginning of the discussion? smile
  • eva
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 26 Aug 2011, 10:06
Cartoon house, I like it in colour as much as in B&W smile
vz-nostalgia: A cartoon house for a cartoon life of an exemplary American cartoon family (not the Simpsons, though). smile
  • Linda
  • United Kingdom
  • 26 Aug 2011, 11:23
He must have had a fun sense of humour to paint in comic book style. Not to my liking but it seems a lot of people do and he must have made lots of money doing it. smile
vz-nostalgia: You got to admit it's a fun way to make money, Ms. Linda. Wanna try? smile
  • KiMeRa
  • Spain
  • 26 Aug 2011, 11:28
interesting photo, i like the tree silhouette over the white
vz-nostalgia: this was one of the reasons for the shot, kimera. smile
Both versions are very good, I would like to see a "fun" third version in B&W with the yellow side of the house colour popped.
vz-nostalgia: I'm not that skillful in Photoshop to make the third "fun" version happen, Brian. smile
  • erika
  • United States
  • 26 Aug 2011, 15:04
meier meets Lichtenstein. The trees really balance it out nicely.
like it!
vz-nostalgia: see my reply to Ray for teh conversation between the little Lichtenstein's house and Richard Meier's masterpiece, Ms. Erica. smile
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 26 Aug 2011, 15:19
Roy Lichtenstein's interpretation of the 'home' button on the pc keypad. Maybe like in: Home isn't home anymore ...

Listening to Moanin right now. Got a jazzy feeling in my fingers.
vz-nostalgia: You know, Louis, for all those hundreds of years I use computers, I've never paid attention, nor used, teh "home" button on a keyboard. I have not a slightest idea what its function is. smile

Hope your wife appreciates that jazzy feeling in your fingers. smile
  • eliza
  • Tanzania
  • 27 Aug 2011, 11:23
i do 'pop up' now and then smile
did you get mine about the delights of bach and different rendtions, 'angular' rostropovich and more soothing yo yo ma. sadly no idea whose rendition is on my video.
an interesting conversion in that hot steamy night...
vz-nostalgia: :
Eliza: i do 'pop up' now and then
VZ: You do? I'd love to watch you popping up. Now and then. smile

Eliza: did you get mine about the delights of bach and different rendtions...
VZ: I'm trying to figure out what Bach has to do with this post of mine, and I'm at a total loss. Help me out. smile

Eliza: an interesting conversion in that hot steamy night...
VZ: I tried to recall when you and I had a conversion in a hot steamy night... and then it occurred to me that, perhaps, you meant to say "conversation" instead of "conversion". I could be wrong, though. smile
The colour is good...but the B&W makes an excellent picture VZ
vz-nostalgia: Where did you study diplomacy, Ron? smile
I really like this picture, the different contrasts are very interesting. The BW version is my favourite.

The disscusion on what art is or should be.....not so interesting in my opinion.....I leave that to the reciever to decide.....as a consequense it could be art, and not art at the same time.....like apples, some like them and some don't.... wink
vz-nostalgia: the blurb is always optional, Aksel. smile And please, don't take anything I say here on Nostalgia seriously. Some people do, and that makes me a bit uncomfortable (or laugh).
Re: the take on art. As I said to Ingrid, it's all a matter of a personal opinion. Yes, some like apples, others like pickles, and I see no reason why I should be bothered with someone else's likes or dislikes. smile As years go by, it's getting more and more evident to me. smile I don't even argue about that anymore, and talk only to those who like to listen. smile
  • elaine
  • France
  • 5 Sep 2011, 13:55
great! like 2 pictures in one! what a contrast all over
vz-nostalgia: "Two for the price of one" smile You know that was teh most shocking thing for me to see at teh supermarkets, when I came to teh US. I loved it. Still do. smile
Excellent b&w image
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