NostalgiaMigranta

05 Sep 2008 1,132 views
 
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photoblog image Sketches From The Forgotten Coast: The Dead Lakes

Sketches From The Forgotten Coast: The Dead Lakes

On the way back home from our annual week on the Gulf of Mexico, Natalya and I decided to stray away from our usual rout and visit a small town of Wewahitchka, Florida, famous for its tupelo honey apiaries. Before paying a visit to the old man L. L. Lanier's beekeeping farm,we turned to the edge of the town to have a peek at the Dead Lakes, we've heard so much about. The scenery of the lakes was so unusually attractive that we spent a few hours there, I with my camera, Natalya with a camcorder. By the time we explored the lakes, it was too late for a visit to the old beekeeper. Oh well, there is always next year (until time comes when it's not).

 

PS. The movie "Ulee's Gold" was shot in this area and old L.L. Lanier consulted Peter Fonda on how to handle the bees.

http://www.lltupelohoney.com/

Sketches From The Forgotten Coast: The Dead Lakes

On the way back home from our annual week on the Gulf of Mexico, Natalya and I decided to stray away from our usual rout and visit a small town of Wewahitchka, Florida, famous for its tupelo honey apiaries. Before paying a visit to the old man L. L. Lanier's beekeeping farm,we turned to the edge of the town to have a peek at the Dead Lakes, we've heard so much about. The scenery of the lakes was so unusually attractive that we spent a few hours there, I with my camera, Natalya with a camcorder. By the time we explored the lakes, it was too late for a visit to the old beekeeper. Oh well, there is always next year (until time comes when it's not).

 

PS. The movie "Ulee's Gold" was shot in this area and old L.L. Lanier consulted Peter Fonda on how to handle the bees.

http://www.lltupelohoney.com/

comments (14)

  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 5 Sep 2008, 11:38
Astonishing scene, VZ.

Reminds me of the swamp that I explored often as a youngster...living near the Murray river in Australia. The loggers came during the dry season and felled the magnificent River Red Gums for use as railway ties.
vz-nostalgia: Well, you are right on point, Ray. This place used to be a swamp with giant cypresses. That's all that's left from a cypress forest, when the dam was created.
Beautiful shot Viktor. I wonder how would it be with colors...
vz-nostalgia: Well, the water would be blue, the trees would be green, the stumps would be brown... smile
mmmmmmmmmm!! ;-) How nice!!!.... I meant which kind of blue, which kind of green... I'm sure it's beautiful too in color!!
vz-nostalgia: smile It is beautiful, Ms. Berta. One day I might post a couple more pictures of this place. I don't shoot landscapes often. I think photography cannot reflect all the beauty of a good landscape: a light breeze on your face, the warmth of sun, the sound of insects...
interesting view
vz-nostalgia: to say the least, doc. My jaw dropped below my knees, when this view suddenly opened in our car window.
  • Ada
  • a very dark room
  • 5 Sep 2008, 23:58
I actually googled this yesterday. It's an interesting looking lake. The shapes look like "okra". We use it to make soup in my country.
vz-nostalgia: Soup from okra? I've never heard of such a thing. Fried okra is still quite popular in the rural areas of the South. Want to try? Here is how:

Southern Fried Okra

1 pound fresh okra
2 eggs, beaten
1/4 cup buttermilk
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 cup cornmeal
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground pepper to taste
Vegetable oil

Wash and slice okra; pat dry with paper towels.
Combine eggs and buttermilk; add okra, and let stand for 10 minutes.
Combine flour, cornmeal, baking powder, salt and pepper.
Drain okra, small portions at a time, using a slotted spoon.
Dredge okra, small portions at a time, in flour mixture.
Pour oil to depth of 2 to 3-inches in a Dutch oven of deep-fat fryer and heat to 375*F (190*C). Fry okra until golden brown. Drain on paper towels and serve immediately.
Makes 4 servings.

I just want to add, I hate okra. smile
I like this, they look very photogenic
vz-nostalgia: They do, don't they, Nig. I wish I had a boat to explore the area.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 6 Sep 2008, 08:48
I can imagine your fascination by that landscape, its deadlike look - no Elysian fields, but perhaps the Styx although I cannot see Charon with his boat- you have intensified by the b&w and the strange plant(?) formations and the reflection (shadows)- very impressive indeed! A scenery in order to stop for a few hours and to reflect thankfully over the own life which we are, ach, so clinging to!
vz-nostalgia: No Elysium here for sure, Ms. Philine, and more likely you'll see a redneck on a fishing boat, than Charon among those stumps. smile
Yep, those "strange plant formations" are the stumps of giant cypresses that used to grow here, when the area was a swamp.
  • PhotoSam
  • United Kingdom
  • 6 Sep 2008, 10:33
a very interesting site in itself and i do like the way you have presented it...
vz-nostalgia: I'm sure I'll be back to explore it a bit more.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 8 Sep 2008, 21:32
Sometimes nature provides the most beautiful lines and patterns for pictures, as the case is here. Even if it is left-overs.

As I was driving home this evening, I was listening to a discussion on the radio about the diminishing bee population of the world. Over the last year or two about two and a half million swarms were lost in the US alone - some professor from over your way quoted the numbers. Idiopathic syndrome seems to be the current diagnosis - impact: polination will be severly impacted ...
vz-nostalgia: I already can see the impact in my garden, Louis. There are very few bees flying among the flowers, mostly bumble bees and all sorts of wasps. I've heard all kinds of theories on the death of the bees, one is stranger than the other, from the air pollution that interfears with bees' smell of nectar, to the impact of the waves of the cell phone towers on the bees' abilities to navigate. Seems no one knows what is going on, truly an idiopathic syndrome.
  • L.Reis
  • Portugal
  • 8 Sep 2008, 21:43
...and there goes my theory of you being in a different planet...this is quite amazing! And I keep thinking of the sound of such a place...or the lack of it...and this "amazing grin piece" of comment, means I'm back and waiting for you to
surprise me for the next months grin
vz-nostalgia: I guess you meant me being FROM a different planet. smile
The sound of this place is mostly silence, which is interrupted by an occasional cry of a big bird, a turtle's dive from a fallen tree, or a fish jump from the water. That's about all the sounds I've heard.
I can't guarantee you surprises, Ms. Reis, but I promise that with every picture the door into my secret world will be opened for you a bit wider. smile
  • Beth
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 9 Sep 2008, 14:17
It's beautiful.....
it looks dead on top but it is probably teeming with life underneath the surface.
vz-nostalgia: I didn't risk to snorkel to verify the life underneath the surface, Beth. The lake is known to be full of alligators. smile
  • Richa
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 9 Sep 2008, 17:31
Entranced. thats the only word I can come up with for this shot.

Why is it called a dead lake? What are those cone thingy coming out of the lake?
vz-nostalgia: Here's a quote from the Forgotten Coast Online, Ms. Richa:

"Reportedly the "Dead Lakes" were formed when sandbars created by the current of the Apalachicola River blocked the Chipola River. The ensuing high water killed thousands of trees in the floodplain but left the eerie looking cypress knee remains. Thus the name "Dead Lakes."
http://www.wildernet.com/pages/area.cfm?areaID=FLSPDELK&CU_ID=1
  • makoto
  • Japan
  • 18 Sep 2008, 12:03
Thanks for a wonderful photo. Looks really attractive place. It's regrettable because it's too far from Japan...
vz-nostalgia: Next time I'll try to get on the water and take a few shots from a boat or a canoe.
People from all over the world flock to Japan to marvel at the nature, architecture, culture and you have regrets that you are far away from rural Florida, Makoto. smile
  • Jim
  • United Kingdom
  • 17 Sep 2009, 16:55
Being a new "boy" just having a good look round, came across this strange alien landscape. As you say "unusually attractive" and a great photo.Never really knew too much about Tupelo Honey other than the great Van Morrison song (great cover by Cassandra Wilson too).
Really enloying your blog.
thanks
vz-nostalgia: As good as the tupelo honey is, to tell the truth, it comes nowhere near the honey from the Altai Mountains, where I grew up, Jim. smile
Yep. Cassandra Wilson's version is not bad. That what she usually does, takes a song, disassembles it and put it back in her own way. Patricia Barber does the same thing, by the way, and maybe even better. smile
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