NostalgiaMigranta

12 Feb 2008 818 views
 
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photoblog image Sketches from the West Coast: Time Will Tell

Sketches from the West Coast: Time Will Tell


Designed by two rebels from Switzerland, Jaques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron, the project created a controversy and wide protests in the city way before it was built. I was there a few years ago, when only the ugly structure dominated this part of the Golden Gate Park. It was a sorry view, I must admit. It looked better this time with the perforated copper skin around the skeleton and, I assume, it will look much better, when the copper starts oxidizing and blending with the lush park greenery.

An old blue-hair lady, bless her heart, saw me photographing the building and, rightly so, presumed I know something about architecture. "Young man," she said (well, thank you darling, I'll take it), "Is this considered to be a great piece of architecture or a piece of junk?"

"Time will tell us, ma'am", I responded diplomatically, without realizing she might never get to know the answer, considering her age.

Don't look for a physical resemblance to the real building here, as I just tried to catch the spirit of the architecture created these two crazy guys that I admire so much. To see how it looks in the real world, google-image "De Young Museum + San Francisco".

Sketches from the West Coast: Time Will Tell


Designed by two rebels from Switzerland, Jaques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron, the project created a controversy and wide protests in the city way before it was built. I was there a few years ago, when only the ugly structure dominated this part of the Golden Gate Park. It was a sorry view, I must admit. It looked better this time with the perforated copper skin around the skeleton and, I assume, it will look much better, when the copper starts oxidizing and blending with the lush park greenery.

An old blue-hair lady, bless her heart, saw me photographing the building and, rightly so, presumed I know something about architecture. "Young man," she said (well, thank you darling, I'll take it), "Is this considered to be a great piece of architecture or a piece of junk?"

"Time will tell us, ma'am", I responded diplomatically, without realizing she might never get to know the answer, considering her age.

Don't look for a physical resemblance to the real building here, as I just tried to catch the spirit of the architecture created these two crazy guys that I admire so much. To see how it looks in the real world, google-image "De Young Museum + San Francisco".

comments (16)

  • Martin
  • Houston, TX
  • 12 Feb 2008, 01:31
Great collection of geometries!
vz-nostalgia: Not my fault, Martin. Blame two other guys. smile
Very bizarre shot that just pulls the eye. Wonderful.
vz-nostalgia: I know my photographs can create wonders from time to time, but to pull the eye out, Mike? smile
  • Kay
  • Portland, OR
  • 12 Feb 2008, 03:30
Lovin this picture! Great angle of view here.
vz-nostalgia: As one Russian poet once said:
"From early childhood the ovals I abhor,
From early childhood the angles I would draw" smile
  • Astrid
  • theNnetherlands
  • 12 Feb 2008, 05:56
'Young man', I googled De Young Museum, I even looked on the map where it is, I haven't have the privelage of being in that part ot the USA, but I can see why the project created all kind of protests, seeing the building on quit a few pictures, I have to say that you hope the copper will start oxidizing in a nice color, I think it showes that these two architects have 'future vision' I have to google those two names yet.
And yet I have to admit I like the building, it is a museum and it shows that this is something special, the way you captured this part of the building visualise the love they have for buildings, the details in it ( now I would love that you can understand Dutch and that I really can say it in English, in others words....I just like it) I had to smile about 'young man', we are the same age grin, so I would have been smiling too if the dear lady would have called me 'young lady'wink
vz-nostalgia: I must admit, I didn't really like how they designed the flow that leads you from exhibition to exhibition, which is very important in planning of a museum. In this case it's kind of chaotic, and at this scale of the museum it could become quite annoying. But they have the best African art collection I have ever seen to date, so I'll forgive them. smile
  • ray
  • Thailand
  • 12 Feb 2008, 12:26
Clever angles, marvellous patterns, crazy irregular hole "pattern"...very fine homage to your idols, VZ.
Don't think I will bother with the Google stuff, as I doubt it would match yours.
vz-nostalgia: Oh Ray. Please google. It's a wonderful building. I just have no interest in shooting architecture the "regular" way. smile
Great angle and very cleverly captured. Well done.
vz-nostalgia: I spent two hours searching for this angle, Ms. Bernie.
Nah, just kidding. smile
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 12 Feb 2008, 17:38
Following Astrid's google- photos,I have only a rough imagination how the building(s) may look, but your description "perforated copper skin (your pic visualizes and lets almost sensually feel this copper skin- wonderful!)...oxidizing and blending with the lush park greenery" evoce fascinating views and a beautiful imagination of an eccentric,foolhardy architecture in my inner eyes! You must know I'm an absolute fan of modern architecture (in Germany: Libeskind in Berlin and Osnabrück,Felix-Nussbaum-Museum; Frank Gehry, MARTA Museum Herford...)! and I love it especially to visit modern museums as courageous forrunners of "future visions" of building, but sometimes, sorry, there are some technical, for example stability- or air-conditions- problems, as time and daily using of a bulding then tell us, and the outsides are (like shop-windows) sometimes more impressive than the inner parts of the builing. Aesthetics and engineering, beauty and function have to come together- an enormous challenge for every architect!
vz-nostalgia: Yep. An enormous challenge is well said, Ms. Philine. Many great buildings by great architects face maintenance challenges. Roofs of Frank Lloyd Wright's buildings notoriously leaked (he once philosophically noted "if it didn't leak, it wouldn't be a roof" ha-ha). MIT is in the process of suing Frank Gehry for similar problems...
  • blackdog
  • Uni Library
  • 12 Feb 2008, 18:27
Good shot Viktor - I have read about the architects in relation to my own studies into alienation, but never seen their work in the flesh. I do know GG Park though and can imagine it makes quite an impact - not a bad thing maybe, as you say, only time will tell!
vz-nostalgia: "...my own studies into alienation..." Sounds intriguing. Could you elaborate a bit, please, when you have a minute?
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 12 Feb 2008, 21:38
J. Herzog and Pierre de Meuron are building the National Stadium for 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing! http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nationalstadion_Peking
vz-nostalgia: Yep. They do. And they face enormous problems over there in China. But I guess they used to it, and manage to deal with it. And I admire these two crazy guys for that. smile
Beautifully constructed photograph which really draws you in. (:o)
vz-nostalgia: Be careful, Ms. Roz. There is no way out from my pictures. smile
Je ne sais pas de quel batiment il s'agit. A te lire cela a l'air très moche.
A la première vue, j'ai cru que c'était un bateau en train de couler : ta plaque de cuivre ressemblant à la mer.
Pour ma part, je trouve cette prise vue superbe!
vz-nostalgia: As I mentioned in my sketch to the photograph, this is a picture of the De Young Museum in San Francisco. i didn't say it's bad, just opposite, I like it.
I love your take on this photograph as a "sinking ship in a sea of copper". Brilliant thought! Thanks, Henri.
Comme j'ai mentionné dans mon croquis à la photographie, ceci est une image du du Jeune Musée dans san francisco. je n'ai pas dit c'est mauvais, juste en face, je l'aime. J'aime votre prend cette photographie comme un « coulant le bateau dans une mer de cuivre ». Pensée brillante ! Merci, Henri.
This is the most extrordinary image: cheese grater meets shipwrecked mesh pyramid. I can't imagine how you took this - but I congratulate you on the surreal effect
vz-nostalgia: No more extraordinary than some of your self-portraits, Chris! I couldn't read without a smile your "cheese grate meets shipwrecked mesh pyramid" line. smile
I agree with Chris, you have given the building a surreal feel with the blur, reflections and then some foliage, I like it.
vz-nostalgia: Not much PP here, Nig. I guess the unexpected angle gives that surreal feel.
  • France
  • Bordeaux
  • 17 Feb 2008, 18:47
She really tell you "young man" ? smile If you come back to Europe one day (I wish you can), have a stop in Bilbao at the Guggenheim Museum, I think you'll like it. From Herzog and De Meuron, I only know the Tate Gallery in London ... As you said, Time will tell us
Hmmm .... a great written ''overture'' to your riveting image. richard
  • Klo
  • SF Bay Area, CA (US)
  • 21 Feb 2008, 20:58
Strange surfaces but attractive composition.
vz-nostalgia: If you're in the Bay Area, you can see these strange surfaces for yourself, Ms. Klo. Where in the Bay Area are you?
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