NostalgiaMigranta

19 Aug 2007 956 views
 
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photoblog image Zyryality: Satie & Robin

Zyryality: Satie & Robin

The morning was calm and peaceful as usual. Natalya and I were having a traditional Russian tea with toasts and a black-currant jam.  Jean-Yves Thibaudet has almost finished the last melancholic touch of Satie's Gymnopedie No.1, when Natalya and I jumped from our chairs, looking at each other with fear in our eyes: something hit really hard on the window right next to us. The crystal fragility of Saturday morning was hopelessly broken. We rushed outside to see what could it be and saw a beautiful robin lying on the ground next to the window. One would think it was asleep, if not for a drop of blood in the corner of its beak.

There was no orchestra, but Natalya and I managed to hum a few phrases from Gymnopedie No.1 over a tiny grave in our garden.

 

Zyryality: Satie & Robin

The morning was calm and peaceful as usual. Natalya and I were having a traditional Russian tea with toasts and a black-currant jam.  Jean-Yves Thibaudet has almost finished the last melancholic touch of Satie's Gymnopedie No.1, when Natalya and I jumped from our chairs, looking at each other with fear in our eyes: something hit really hard on the window right next to us. The crystal fragility of Saturday morning was hopelessly broken. We rushed outside to see what could it be and saw a beautiful robin lying on the ground next to the window. One would think it was asleep, if not for a drop of blood in the corner of its beak.

There was no orchestra, but Natalya and I managed to hum a few phrases from Gymnopedie No.1 over a tiny grave in our garden.

 

comments (9)

  • Tony
  • 21 Aug 2007, 13:25
A dead bird? Dude, gross.
vz-nostalgia: Beauty is not only in spectacular sunsets, Tony. Do you enjoy a splash of autumn leaves? They're dead. I think a bit of Charles Baudelaire poetry might shed some light on my point for you. Go ahead and pick up a volume at your local library. Then we can talk.
  • mal
  • 21 Aug 2007, 18:45
beauty in death, there is a beautiful paradox to be understood. love the shot. mal
vz-nostalgia: I'm working at it, malcolm. Give me some time.
Good story, good shot. The choice not to show the full colors of the "death" was a really good one. It keeps it from being morbid and instead gives the bird beauty.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 10 Sep 2007, 07:51
Pity the robin, attracted by the Satie to the Russian Breakfast party, struck by a motionless plate of glass.

It is an excellent image, VZ, with its purple/grey hue, but cannot restore all that your glass stole. Dead things can retain a beauty of sorts, but it is primarily the hazy memory of that which was alive.
vz-nostalgia: Cheers, Ray. Like your reflections on my picture. You're always welcome on the nostalgia.
VZ: You are a brother. I have taken pictures of road kill and victims of my two clever cats. Many people feel repulsion instead of appreciation for the minutes or days following the death of an animal. The first thing I did when I saw a deer in the nearby orchard covered with a dusting of snow was to run home for the camera.

Your story was pure poetry. I particularly enjoyed your retort to Tony!

I shall follow your photo blog.

Thanks for everything you do.

Erik
vz-nostalgia: From what I can gather you live in the country, and have a great access to a wild life, which gives us an endless inspiration. Lucky you.
  • Suzanne
  • Canada
  • 14 Apr 2010, 08:20
This is so sad, Viktor. I have heard that sickening thud so many times yet will never be immune to it. At least this Robin had a few sweet notes upon which to perch her soul...a sorrowful consolation.
vz-nostalgia: I see so many dead birds around the highrise buildings, Ms. Suzanne, who are lured in by the reflection of the flowing clouds in the enormous walls of glass. But seeing them after the fact is one thing, and experience the death in front of you is quite another. Once, on my way to work one early morning I saw a dead owl on the sidewalk. A big, unbelievably gorgeous bird, which didn't make it through the glass. My day was ruined.
  • iris
  • Germany
  • 28 May 2010, 18:47
Writing about life yesterday, I come to this one now. Dead birds have always appealed to me and they still do for their quiet and peaceful appearence. They are so full of grace. Knowing, that you buried this beautiful robin with honor is really consoling.
vz-nostalgia: We can't talk about life without talking about death, right Ms. Iris? The conversation would be incomplete.
  • iris
  • Germany
  • 28 May 2010, 20:35
So true, Viktor.
vz-nostalgia: smile I thought so. smile
Love the shot. The dead bird still looks humble and full of nature's powers, its eyes half-open. I really enjoyed it, because frankly - animals posses such a dignity in their leaving life, like there's not a drop of regret or anything. Which reminds me of an extraordinary peice of poetry:

Self Pity

I never saw a wild thing
sorry for itself.
A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough
without ever having felt sorry for itself.
D. H. Lawrence (used to love Lawrence in college, so emotional...)
vz-nostalgia: What an unexpected observation, Ms. Renata. Yes, death in nature could be even more beautiful than life. Just the summer leaves with teh autumn foliage.
D. H. Lawrence lines fit here like a glove. smile
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